The Benefits of Reading Inside Your Genre: 

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Reading is one of those things that every writer knows that they should do, but a lot of us just don’t make time to do. I’ll be the first to admit that I am horrible at making time to read. When faced with everyday chores and activities, combined with your own in-work novel, it’s easy to classify sitting down with a book as time wasted.

But is it really?

Or is that just an excuse; a subconscious lie we tell ourselves so we don’t feel bad about not reading. Maybe if we as writers realized the benefits of reading—especially reading inside your chosen genre (or genres)—we’d be a lot more eager to pick up a novel and take the time to read it cover to cover.

So what are some of the benefits of reading inside the genre(s) you plan to write in?
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5 Tips for Writing a Strong Short Story – My Guest Post on The One Year Adventure Novel Blog

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This week, I am very excited to be featured on Blog The Adventure the official blog of the One Year Adventure Novel by Daniel Schwabauer. One Year Adventure Novel is an absolutely amazing writing curriculum. If you haven’t heard of it, I highly suggest you give it a look. you can find more about it here. In addition to hosting my article, Blog The Adventure also has loads of helpful advice and tips, so go check them out! Here’s an excerpt from the post:

In many ways, writing short stories can be daunting for beginning writers. A non-writer may equate shorter with easier, but a writer?… How in the world do you tell a story in only 7,300 words?!

For a long time I did not even try because I believed failure was inevitable. But once I actually forced myself to give it a go, I realized that it’s really a lot less intimidating than it seems!

I’ve now successfully written several short stories. Along the way, I discovered 5 tips that I hope you will find helpful in your own short story endeavors.

You can read the entire article here: 5 Tips for Writing a Strong Short Story


photo credit: writing by Vassilis via photopin license (Dimensions adjusted, border added)

4 Beneficial Reasons To Outline Before Writing:

I used to be (and largely still am) a pantser. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the term let me explain: In the writing world, there are two types of writers: “Plotters”, and “Pantsers” (don’t ask who came up with the terms because I honestly don’t know)

  • Plotters create an abbreviated plot outline detailing the way their story will unfold, before they write.
  • Pantsers (as the name implies) tend to write by the seat of their pants, creating and shaping the plot as they write.

In my years as a writer, I have always been a dedicated pantser and turned my nose up at even the prospect of outlining. Outlines are for sissies.” Largely summed up my attitude, I considered them worthless, and counted them as unnecessary time-wasters that were just downright boring! I mean, why write an outline when you can just write the story. Right?

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My Journey Thus Far: How & Why I Became A Writer

When I was twelve years old, I armed myself with a piece of notebook paper, and a trusty no. 2 pencil. I delved into the world of story-making, and I’ve never looked back.

It started as a hobby, something that I did for fun. Honestly, I never planned it would turn into a career (OK, I’m still working on that…). I remember that it was largely due to Star Wars that I started. Even at twelve, I was an avid science-fiction reader and Star War addict (Those who know me well could argue that I haven’t changed much) and eventually, I determined that I would see my name on the front cover of a Star Wars Novel. I can’t really remember why I didn’t ever actually write down that first novel idea, (who knows, maybe it’s still in there bouncing around somewhere) but within a few days of my proclamation of “I am going to write a book.” I had shifted to a new story, one of my own creation.

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16 Questions To Get The Most Out of Your Beta-Readers: Part-II

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Last week, in my post  16 Questions To Get The Most Out of Your Beta-Readers: Part-I  I presented eight thought-provoking questions to ask Beta-readers after they’ve completed reading your finished, or in-work story. While the first eight questions covered Story related questions, the final eight questions focus on Character.

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